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24-hour theater

8:58 AM  Jan 23rd, 2006
by Anthony Fulton, lecturer in UD's department of English

On Friday, Jan. 13, after lecturing on the essential elements of a play to my Introduction to Literature class, I rushed off to Columbus, Ohio, to write a one-act play in less than 12 hours. For four years, BlueForms Theatre Group has been hosting “24 Hour Theater,” in which six short plays are written, cast, rehearsed and performed in a period of 24 hours. This year’s event, called “The Bride of 24 Hours,” kicked off at 8 p.m. on a Friday night.

The 20 participating actors arrived in silly costumes, equipped with even sillier props. As they joked and laughed, I sat off to the side, deciding that the event was torture disguised as art. Randomly paired with four actors, I wrote for a woman in a white lab coat, a “goth” girl, a stylish 20-something, and a woman cradling a log. At 9 p.m., I felt like passing out. At 10, I soothed a mounting panic attack with fast food. At midnight, I hit upon a simple but quirky family scene and ran with it.

Watching the show the next night, I caught myself laughing hysterically — not from lack of sleep but because I was having fun. I never thought I’d have fun, but I guess that’s another element of a play, even the 24-hour kind.

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A semester with Adèle

8:39 AM  
by Matthew Dewald

Soft-spoken senior Erin Anderson quieted Kennedy Union’s Torch Lounge as she talked of living in community with four 70-years-plus nuns in small Agen, France, in spring 2005. Like the tiny nun who dragged Anderson’s 70-pound suitcase to the car when she arrived, Anderson’s words and demeanor reminded one of the many manifestations of strength.

Her unusual study abroad experience was an effort to learn more about Adèle de Batz de Trenquelléon, one of the founders of the Society of Mary.

“To get from the kitchen to the dining room, I had to pass by her tomb,” she said. “At night the halls of the 17th-century convent scared the hell out of me. I found myself pausing to offer prayers of thanks and gratitude for this woman’s life and great faith.”

Reflecting on the meaning and purpose of Adèle’s life was really a way of thinking about herself, she suggested.

Like Adèle, Anderson picked up a pen and began writing old-fashioned letters to friends and family of her days helping teach at a local school and her trips in the area.

“I reckon some graduating seniors out there are like me, searching for mission and purpose,” she said.

Anderson was one of a dozen speakers at the day-long Chaminade Day Teach-in today.

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Lessons from a Nobel Peace Prize winner

8:33 AM  
by Lynette Heard

Nobel Peace Prize winner John Hume made a brief visit at the University of Dayton board of trustees winter meeting and retreat Jan. 19. Hume, co-recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize in 1998 for his efforts to bring peace to Ireland, outlined the principles upon which the peace negotiations were based:

• Respect for differences and an understanding for the diversity of ideas, races, principles and socio-economic status.

• Institutional representatives who are proportionally elected are the responsible parties.

• Parties that work together in the common interest, “the socio-economic interest,” of the people and the nation. Through this work, they will shed “sweat but not blood,” he said.

Hume’s work was built on the idea that borders in Ireland were not lines on a map but in the hearts and minds of the people. Hume was a founding member of Northern Ireland’s predominantly Roman Catholic Social Democratic and Labour Party, which he led from 1979 to 2001. The Nobel Committee cited Hume and Peace Prize co-recipient David Trimble, leader of the Ulster Unionist party, for their role in bringing about an agreement aimed at settling “the national religious and social conflict in Northern Ireland that has cost over 3,500 people their lives.”

Hume, who retired from politics in 2004, said he found inspiration for his work when he visited the United States, learned more about the presidency of Abraham Lincoln and became fascinated with the concept of E pluribus Unum — “through many, one.” Hume urged trustees to consider ways in which the United States and European nations could come together to end areas of conflict throughout the world. He also urged the board to remember respect for diversity.

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On tap Tuesdays

1:20 PM  Jan 18th, 2006
by Kailyn Derck ’06

Shuffle-ball-change.

Among a few others, like toe-dig and heel-toe, that is what I learned at the Tuesday night Tap Jam at ArtStreet.

Sharon Leahy, UD artist in residence and artistic director of Rhythm in Shoes, hosts a weekly two-hour jam session for tappers of all levels. Some of the dozen-or-so women coming and going from 7 to 9 p.m. were well-trained and could keep up with Leahy’s fast feet. Others, like me, borrowed shoes from a bin and attempted to make some kind of clicking sound.

We began the session on a tapping board in a glass room, Studio A1. As Rick Good, Leahy’s husband, played the guitar, we stood in a circle and Leahy taught us a basic step. We all held the step together and then every other eight-count a new dancer added her own steps. My inexperience was noticeable but not shamed. Leahy was patient with the many beginners and took time to teach us a few moves.

Per Leahy’s request, Good then began a “swingy, mid-tempo” tune and we “traded in,” as Leahy called it. It was almost like a dancer’s challenge: one dancer completed a complicated (or not-so-complicated) eight-count and the second would either repeat her steps or create a more challenging arrangement.

And even if your feet have never filled a tap shoe, it is fun to watch the dancers click away and think, “I could never make my feet move like that! How are they doing it?”

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75 dozen eggs

1:17 PM  
by Deborah McCarty Smith

That’s how many you have to scramble if you’re going to feed 450 people at UD’s annual Martin Luther King Jr. prayer breakfast. While guests are sleepily filing into Kennedy Union ballroom at 7:30 a.m., catering services supervisors and chefs have been at their posts since 5:30 a.m. and the service staff since 6.

In all, they’ll cook 100 pounds of bacon, dish up biscuits and hash browns, pour 25 gallons of orange juice and 50 gallons of coffee and, in their black bowties and aprons, quietly maneuver among the crowded tables to deliver covered plates to each guest. Doug Lemaster, catering services’ general manager, says it takes 138 hours of student labor and 40 hours of staff time to stage the annually sold-out event. Despite the early start, the UD students who make up most of the service and prep staff, clocked “nearly 100 percent attendance, and they really did an excellent job.”

Melissa Clark, event coordinator, and Rosie O’Boyle of student development choose the menu in December. The week before the breakfast, catering management, supervisors and chefs all meet to plan the event down to the smallest details.

After a keynote address by columnist Clarence Page and the traditional singing of “Lift Ev’ry Voice and Sing,” guests were back in their classrooms and offices by 9 a.m., bodies nourished, hearts challenged and spirits uplifted.

“I just love it when a plan comes together,” Lemaster said.

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On tap Tuesdays

10:08 AM  
by Kailyn Derck ’06

Shuffle-ball-change.

Among a few others, like toe-dig and heel-toe, that is what I learned at the Tuesday night Tap Jam at ArtStreet.
Sharon Leahy, UD artist in residence and artistic director of Rhythm in Shoes, hosts a weekly two-hour jam session for tappers of all levels. Some of the dozen-or-so women coming and going from 7 to 9 p.m. were well-trained and could keep up with Leahy’s fast feet. Others, like me, borrowed shoes from a bin and attempted to make some kind of clicking sound.

We began the session on a tapping board in a glass room, Studio A1. As Rick Good, Leahy’s husband, played the guitar, we stood in a circle and Leahy taught us a basic step. We all held the step together and then every other eight-count a new dancer added her own steps. My inexperience was noticeable but not shamed. Leahy was patient with the many beginners and took time to teach us a few moves.

Per Leahy’s request, Good then began a “swingy, mid-tempo” tune and we “traded in,” as Leahy called it. It was almost like a dancer’s challenge: one dancer completed a complicated (or not-so-complicated) eight-count and the second would either repeat her steps or create a more challenging arrangement.

And even if your feet have never filled a tap shoe, it is fun to watch the dancers click away and think, “I could never make my feet move like that! How are they doing it?”

No Comments

75 dozen eggs

10:02 AM  
by Deborah McCarty Smith

That’s how many you have to scramble if you’re going to feed 450 people at UD’s annual Martin Luther King Jr. prayer breakfast. While guests are sleepily filing into Kennedy Union ballroom at 7:30 a.m., catering services supervisors and chefs have been at their posts since 5:30 a.m. and the service staff since 6.

In all, they’ll cook 100 pounds of bacon, dish up biscuits and hash browns, pour 25 gallons of orange juice and 50 gallons of coffee and, in their black bowties and aprons, quietly maneuver among the crowded tables to deliver covered plates to each guest. Doug Lemaster, catering services’ general manager, says it takes 138 hours of student labor and 40 hours of staff time to stage the annually sold-out event. Despite the early start, the UD students who make up most of the service and prep staff, clocked “nearly 100 percent attendance, and they really did an excellent job.”

Melissa Clark, event coordinator, and Rosie O’Boyle of student development choose the menu in December. The week before the breakfast, catering management, supervisors and chefs all meet to plan the event down to the smallest details.

After a keynote address by columnist Clarence Page and the traditional singing of “Lift Ev’ry Voice and Sing,” guests were back in their classrooms and offices by 9 a.m., bodies nourished, hearts challenged and spirits uplifted.

“I just love it when a plan comes together,” Lemaster said.

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Patron saint of e-mail?

9:04 AM  
by Shelby Quinlivan ’06

“O my God, my heart is too small to love you, so I will make you loved by so many other hearts, that their love will make up for the littleness of mine.”

That’s an excerpt from letter No. 325, written by Adèle de Batz de Trenquelléon, founder of the Daughters of Mary Immaculate, the Marianist sisters. Written on May 14, 1818, it’s one of 1,200 of Adèle’s letters that have been saved.

On Jan. 10, more than 187 years since that particular letter was written, more than 100 people gathered in Immaculate Conception Chapel for a vespers service to celebrate Adèle’s life and service and to hear excerpts from her letters. Later that evening in Stuart Hall Chapel, “Who’s the Patron Saint of E-mail?”, an event organized by Sister Laura Leming, FMI, introduced a new generation of frequent communicators to Adèle, who began her ministry at age 15 through letter writing, encouraging others to live a life of faith and good works. Her letters document her passion for God and the many connections she made with others.

In Adèle’s spirit, Sister Leming encouraged participants to write their own letters to friends who may need encouragement or to share something good going on in their own lives.

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What pines?

1:22 PM  Jan 11th, 2006
by Thomas M. Columbus with information from archivist Kerrie Cross, biology professor Donald Geiger, S.M., and librarian and master gardener Kathleen Tiller

Lee Gosink ’62 e-mailed us noting that the January photo on his UD donor calendar is captioned “Our Lady of the Pines, Serenity Pines.” But the tree behind Mary looks like a spruce.

It is.

The statue called Our Lady of the Pines existed long before that spruce, before the Mary garden called Serenity Pines and even before many of the pines on that meditative spot by the Marianist cemetery next to Marycrest.

In 1883 a building, where St. Joseph Hall is now, burnt. Onlookers feared for the Chapel of the Immaculate Conception. Brother Joseph Meyer, S.M., promised Mary that, if she would protect her chapel, they would erect a statue in her honor.

Thus, Our Lady of the Pines.

UD folk, however, may have always had some confusion with trees. Reportedly the original statue was surrounded by Norway spruce. So the statue’s name, in the words of 1935 Marianist publication, is “more poetically beautiful than accurate.”

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Off the wall

1:31 PM  Jan 6th, 2006
by Deborah McCarty Smith

Kaitlin Wasik’s parents may have to get used to a blank spot on their family room wall in Perrysburg, Ohio. “Snorkeling,” Wasik’s pastel self-portrait drawn from a photo taken in Maui when she was 4, will be on exhibit in Alumni Hall until Thanksgiving.

The piece is one of 18 works selected for the sixth annual Honors Art Exhibition, a juried show open to all students in the University Honors and Berry Scholars programs.

It’s the first exhibit for Wasik, a first-year middle childhood education major. Sam Wukusick, a junior studio art major, is showing “Hosur Triptych,” offering visitors a chance to see more of the work he created after his immersion trip to India.

Other students whose work was chosen include majors in chemical engineering, leadership, international studies, religious studies, biology, biochemistry, Spanish, visual communication design and art education.

The “Best of Show” award, a $1,000 scholarship, went to Helen Smith, a senior biochemistry major, for her digital photograph, “Waiting.” Stop by Alumni Hall 125 and see the show.

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