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ways of war book

Ways of War

9:52 AM  Dec 29th, 2014
by Erin Callahan '15

A book by David J. Ulbrich ’93.

A medium-length military textbook was needed to fill a void in the market, and Ulbrich met that demand, using knowledge from a history degree to cowrite a comprehensive overview of America’s military history. It can easily be covered during a 15-week college course, and the additional Web-based materials are convenient for classroom use, Ulbrich said. Since publication, it has become required reading in the U.S. Air Force Academy. “War is terrible,” he said, “but we use it to avoid things that are worse than war. Down the line, these students may look back to reading this book about the past and apply it to the present.”

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mass 101 book rgb

Mass 101: Liturgy and Life

9:49 AM  Dec 29th, 2014
by Erin Callahan '15

A book by Emily Strand ’05.

Mass 101: Liturgy and Life outlines the basics of Mass and guides readers through the Catholic tradition of worship. “This book is written not for scholars but for average people who want to deepen their understanding of the Mass,” she said. As a campus minister and director of liturgy at UD for seven years, Strand was excited to put her knowledge and experience into the book. “I spent so much time, thought and prayer on how to prepare students for their participation in the Mass as liturgical ministers,” she said. “I was happy to use that again and put it all in one place.”

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lily book

Lily Lightning Bug and Her Stolen Glow

9:48 AM  Dec 29th, 2014
by Erin Callahan '15

A book by Jeannette M. Adkins ’81

When Lily Lightning Bug has her glow stolen by two bigger bugs, she’s plunged into a world of fear and uncertainty — and that’s before she has to navigate the intimidating criminal justice system. Adkins, who has worked in crime victim services for more than 30 years, wrote her book to support children who are victims or witnesses of a crime, and victim’s advocates often read the book with children to help prepare them for the process of testifying. “The book references sexual abuse, but placing the story in the world of bugs makes the concept easier for children to understand and be interested in,” Adkins said.

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to jonah book

To Jonah, When You Are Twenty-Five

9:45 AM  Dec 29th, 2014
by Erin Callahan '15

A book by James Herbert ’63.

Full of letters from Herbert to today’s young adults, the author uses his lengthy career experience in New York City and Washington, D.C., to offer advice to the next generation. He’s been there, done that, and now he’s cheering them
on. Herbert wanted to write to young adults, not about them, he said, to explain what a liberal arts education is actually good for in the real world. “You know how to make good things happen in the world. You could choose to work against the system — how the work world works — or to conform to it, but you don’t have to make that choice,” he said.

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Photo by Larry Burgess

Sustaining the future

9:44 AM  Dec 29th, 2014
by Cilla Shindell

At the announcement, there was a gasp from the crowd followed by a long ovation — sustained clapping for the new Hanley Sustainability Institute.

The campus community gathered in the Central Mall Sept. 19 to hear of the $12.5 million gift from George Hanley, a 1977 business graduate and member of the University of Dayton board of trustees, and his wife, Amanda Hanley, to support the University’s goal to become a national leader in sustainability education. It is the largest single gift in University history.

President Daniel J. Curran said the gift is an investment in the future of our planet from a couple who is passionate about environmental protection and the common good.

“At many universities, sustainability education is focused solely on the environmental sciences,” Curran said. “This gift will extend sustainability education across multiple disciplines. We’re deeply grateful to the Hanleys for their generosity and vision.”

Initial plans for the institute include developing an interdisciplinary graduate certificate in sustainability; creating an urban agriculture demonstration project with community partners; establishing Hanley Research Fellows and Hanley Scholars-in-Residence to support student and faculty research; and inaugurating the Hanley Conference on Sustainability Education. The goal is for the University to become the top-rated Catholic university on the STARS (Sustainability
Tracking, Assessment and Rating System) list for sustainability in higher education.

Noted Curran, “Sustainability is really a philosophy that stems from our Catholic, Marianist mission. It’s about how we protect the poor and vulnerable in our world. It’s about respecting human dignity. It’s about promoting the common good. In this respect the new Hanley Sustainability Institute complements our commitments in human rights research and education.”

The Hanleys took the podium to express their support for good work already achieved by the University community.

“My time here has affected … my life in so many ways,” George Hanley said. “This gift is about providing students, faculty and staff with the resources to solve the problems our world faces but also to take advantage of the opportunities.”

Added Amanda Hanley: “We are thrilled with UD’s national leadership and hope one day interdisciplinary sustainability education will run deep at every university.”

Ryan Schuessler, senior mechanical engineering student and director of the University’s 2014 Sustainability Week, said he’s seen interest in sustainability take off.

“A record number of first-year students selected sustainability as their learning-living community this year,” Schuessler said. “The sustainability movement is growing so fast. Students are looking for ways to link academics with action.”

Senior Saehan Lenzen is a mechanical engineering major with both a minor in sustainability and a concentration in energy systems.

“There’s so much passion for sustainability, and now we have the support for what we need to do. This pushes me toward staying [at UD] longer,” for a graduate degree, she said.

With the Hanleys’ lead gift, the University will launch a comprehensive campaign to raise additional funds from foundations, corporations and other donors to bring total funding for the institute to $25 million.

About the Hanleys

The Chicago couple have long been generous donors to the University. In 2007, they established the Hanley Trading Center in the University’s School of Business Administration. A recent gift supported the University’s ETHOS program, which allows students to use their engineering skills to implement locally sustainable technologies for humanitarian purposes around the world.

George Hanley is best known for founding Chicago-based Hanley Group, which was acquired by INTLFCStone, and for his membership at the Chicago Board of Trade and Chicago Mercantile Exchange, now CME Group. He presently serves as a co-founder and principal of Level 5 Trading.

Amanda Hanley is a strong advocate of environmental protection and innovative ideas for a healthier planet, people and economy. She has been working toward sustainable solutions for more than 25 years, serves on various environmental
boards, and frequently blogs about green issues.

George and Amanda Hanley created their family foundation in 1997. It has come to support organizations that are advancing environmental, educational and social empowerment solutions, both on a local and global scale. They are particularly drawn to innovative models in sustainability that can lead to wider systemic change and greater impact.

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stars

Seeing stars

9:43 AM  Dec 29th, 2014
by Emma Jensen '16

As children, we’re taught to sing about twinkling little stars and wonder how they are; we learn to wish upon them; we hope to catch those that fall and put them in our pockets.

But what doesn’t often get included in these lessons is how to find the stars and their constellations. One University of Dayton class seeks to change that.

Andrea Massimilian ’14 took the stargazing class, taught by Brother Dan Klco, S.M. ’92, during her senior year. Today she is a first-year fellow in the Orr Entrepreneurial Fellowship program.

For those of us outside the classroom, here’s your own ticket to stardom.

1. Know when to be in or out. Klco structured his classes around three different scenarios based on cloud coverage. “If there was complete cloud coverage, we would be learning in the classroom about the night sky and constellations,” Massimilian recalled. “If there was partial visibility, we would be in the classroom for part of the time and then work with a telescope. On the nights where there was no cloud coverage, we would go to a farm about 40 minutes away and view parts of the solar system, like Jupiter and Mars.”

2. Take a field trip. The best way to view stars is away from the “Dayton bubble,” Klco says; the campus and city give off too much ambient light, preventing many stars from being seen. True stargazers find a dark area away from any lights like the farm where Klco takes his class. There are also other ways to view stars around Dayton. “We took a field trip to the Boonshoft Museum of Discovery’s planetarium and got a private tour of the gigantic telescope there that is open to the public on Friday nights,” Massimilian said.

3. Know the constellations of the season. The constellations change from season to season based on the orbit of the Earth. “Most people know that in summer you see the Little Dipper and Big Dipper, but where are they in the winter?” Massimilian said. You can visit websites, like stardate.org, to look up what constellations can be found in each time of year.

4. Do not mistake your stars. The gospels of Luke and Matthew tell the story of the Nativity of Jesus. An important element of the story is the Star of Bethlehem, or Christmas Star, which guides the three Magi from the East to Jesus. They bless him with gifts and receive a divine warning to not return to Herod. It is not uncommon to hear people confuse the Star of Bethlehem with the North Star, which many people also associate with guiding slaves to freedom during the Civil War era. Since it is unlikely Jesus was born Dec. 25, it is hard to know what in the sky was the brightest the night he was born, she said.

5. Apps are your friends. Klco provided his students with several websites and apps for them to resource throughout the semester, like Star Chart and Night Sky Lite. They benefit users by helping them pinpoint constellations in the sky. “If you open the app on your phone and point the camera at the sky, the app will outline the constellations and identify them for you,” Massimilian said.

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Rudy in Milwaukee by Frank Pauer

Milwaukee

9:41 AM  Dec 29th, 2014
by Michelle Friman '15

As holiday festivities rolled around, alumni in Milwaukee were laser-focused on the big event: Christmas (Off Campus, that is).

This season, their community served dinner at the Guest House of Milwaukee, a men’s homeless shelter. It’s one of a series of yuletide projects alumni like Susan Timms Cantwell ’86 have looked forward to year after year.

“We’ve volunteered with the shelter for the last four years, and I love seeing residents engaged through cookie decorating and ornament making,” said Cantwell, who’s been active with the Milwaukee group for 15 years.

One year, there was a day spent sorting shelter donations; another year, the crew helped stage a performance of the Nativity with children at a local church, complete with costumes and set direction. Another time,

Flyers hosted a Christmas party at the Boys and Girls Club, dressing up in animal masks and diving into ornament decorating.

“My husband and I both went to UD,” Cantwell said. “I love to share the feeling I got while being at school. The memories, the emotional nostalgia and the love from growing up on campus is why I drag everyone I can over to Dayton.”

Community leader Jennifer Johnson ’07 made a beeline for the group as soon as she moved to Milwaukee in 2013.

“The opportunity to combine my passion for Milwaukee and UD was a no-brainer,” she said. “My goal as community leader is to make sure I’m easily available to area alumni and perpetuating a learn, lead and serve lifestyle.”

So what’s a Milwaukee community to do the other 364 days a year? Continue coming together with purpose. They frequent businesses unique to southern Wisconsin — like the Lakefront Brewery, where every tour ends with a round of the Laverne & Shirley TV show theme song — and those with Flyer connections, like Purple Door Ice Cream, owned by Lauren McCoy Schultz ’01.

From reindeer cookies to musical pints, Milwaukee alumni say the best part about getting together is seeing the Marianist values they learned on campus living outside Dayton.

Save us a seat.

There’s a lake, the northern climate and three horticultural domes. So, which season is your favorite for experiencing Milwaukee?

“The very beginning of summer. There is such an excitement then. There might still be crispness in the air from spring, but everyone is outside and ready to take on all things Milwaukee.”
—Lauren McCoy Schultz ’01

“I love our area. My favorite season is fall, but I can describe my favorite things about here, regardless of season, to anyone, anytime.”
—Carrie Ballard ’01

“While the recent display of beautiful fall color tried to sway me, in summer Milwaukee shines brightest. Residents get Summerfest’s selection of musical acts, cultural festivals and the opportunity to take full advantage of our Great Lake
by boat or beach. Summer is the best time to take in a play in the woods at Spring Green’s American Players Theatre after touring the grounds of Frank Lloyd Wright’s Taliesin estate.”
—Greg Calhoun ’08

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by Jed Gerlach

UD recipe

9:38 AM  Dec 29th, 2014
by Michelle Tedford '94

There are nights I show up at UD Arena and I know the man in front of me groans a silent groan.

Every game, he’s here to watch basketball. Every game, I’m here to watch basketball … and get a pinch of something more.

Last time, it was fennel.

As we watched players run up and down the floor, Jo Hinker and I discussed soup. She wrestled with stubborn, hard pinto beans. I shared a disgust for carrots but an obsession for carrot-ginger soup.

Her tale of a near-mythical tomato, orzo and fennel mélange made me miss a slam dunk.

The next day, she emailed me three recipes. I copied two of my favorites to index cards for her.

I only know Jo and her husband, Neal Hinker ’79, because our basketball seats are side by side. We are of different generations, live on different ends of town; but there’s something very familiar about the relationship. It starts with UD, and soon they’re attending one of my husband’s plays and we’re donating to one of their favorite charities.

I’m writing this column between Thanksgiving and Christmas, which may explain my uncharacteristic sentimentality. I can be as curmudgeonly as the next editor, but I feel that relationships with UD at their heart become something better, or deeper, or faster than other associations.

For example, my experience of “minoring in the Majkas.” More than 20 years after graduation, I tell anyone who will listen about the block of sociology courses I took from professors Linda and Theo Majka. Their lessons still inform the way I consider life, from the Supreme Court case on pregnancy as disability to the rulings on use of police force against black men.

In the years since, my husband and I shared a meal with the Majkas at a Denver Tex-Mex restaurant. On another occasion, the four of us walked together through a nature preserve to see the bluebells in bloom. Those memories are a few of the reasons I was so saddened to learn of Linda’s death this November.

In Class Notes this issue, there are stories of Flyer strangers meeting along the Columbia River (Page 55), on a train in New Zealand (Page 42) and on a golf course in New York state (Page 46). They knew what this column was about before I even started writing it. (I could’ve asked them to write this; it would have saved me a lot of time.)

I’d guess the man who sits in front of me at Flyer games does, too.

“It’s about connections,” I bet he’d say, not turning his head from the court. “And soup.” And then I’d hand him a handwritten recipe card.

Maybe I will.

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pachoko 9

Research: Child labor in tili lamp fishing, northern Malawi

8:38 AM  Dec 29th, 2014
by Jed Gerlach '15

Malawi is a nation of two-thirds land and one-third lake. Lake Malawi is 360 miles long, 47 miles wide and, at 2,316 feet, one of the deepest in the world. Fishing is embedded in the culture. When I talked to children in northern Malawi, they told me they often start and end their days fishing with their families. After school, they fish by themselves or with friends. They spend the rest of their time swimming.

Families fish to feed themselves. Fathers teach their boys. Women traditionally do not participate in fishing. As I walked five days up the shore talking to local people, I found that the village of Tilivumbo had no such cultural reservations. As in this photo, the girls fished along with the boys. The most common fishing from the shore is with gill nets. Families put them in the water in the morning, anchoring them with rocks. In the afternoon, they return and pull them in together.

While fishing is a family activity, there is a problem with child labor in the fishing industry. Around age 10, boys begin to join the men in dugout canoes, paddling hours through the dark night on the deep lake. Their knees are bloodied by the rough canoe edges. Their hands are torn in the fishing nets. They are beaten with oars. They can drown. Boys who fish every night are often orphans who must support themselves and their families, or they are required to fish by their fathers.

Night fishing is done with tili lamps, fueled by paraffin. Around dark, an experienced fisherman called a sanginara paddles his canoe out into the deep, his lamp attracting usipa, a sardine-sized fish that swims in schools. Two more canoes will join him, with men and boys dragging a large net to capture the fish and haul them into the boat. They will fish until 6 a.m., when they return to shore to sell their catch to fellow villagers and sometimes the wider market.

During my eight weeks in Malawi, I relied on Frackson Mhango as a translator and an expert; as a child, he fished Lake Malawi. Mhango is now studying human rights at the University of Livingstonia, funded by Matt Maroon ’06 and Determined to Develop. We conducted research at 15 schools, interviewing headmasters, teachers and children. The boys told us how they’d go straight from fishing to school, often with no sleep and no food. Child labor has a major impact on their education. They fall asleep in class, or they decide that fishing — and making money, kwacha — is more important than education. Most boys need to fish to afford school fees, uniforms and books. Schools recognize the problem. Boys who go fishing instead of going to school may receive a whipping with a thin stick or be given school chores like cleaning out a latrine.

In Nkhata Bay, the Ripple Africa organization is working with village leaders to discourage fishing practices that harm children, such as fishing that interferes with school or “fish for sex,” where girls trade their bodies for food. When rules are broken, it is the adults who are punished, not the children. Getting villages to adopt such laws is part of Ripple Africa’s plan to encourage sustainable fishing communities. The organization told me it plans to share its model with villages outside of Nkhata Bay for wider impact.

Fishermen tell stories of large catches pulled in less than a decade ago. Today, they are lucky to bring in a full catch, or even any of the most prized large fish, chambo. Overfishing has many causes, including the effectiveness of tili lamps (men used to fish with bonfires on their wooden canoes). While child labor is bad, what is worse is that they are all training for a job that won’t be around by the time they are my age. There won’t be any fish, and they won’t have an education. I talked with local leaders, and they say these boys will likely grow to have only crime and despair.

Poverty is the root cause of child labor in the fishing industry. Night fishing is an epidemic that few are addressing, so I hope my research will help ignite conversation. I will present my research on campus at the Roesch Social Science Symposium and the Stander Symposium. I hope my research will be a resource for Malawian communities and Matt Maroon to better understand child labor in tili lamp fishing and to address the issue as a community. International organizations and NGOs working in Malawi will be able to use my work to conduct more research or build a project that addresses the issue.

Photojournalism as a career is a dream I have had since my freshman year. I began taking photographs when I studied abroad in Morocco in the fall of 2013, and I still have so much to learn. This year, I am a student photographer for the office that produces the University of Dayton Magazine. I am selling prints of my Malawi photos at etsy.com/shop/jedgerlachphoto to support the NGO Determined to Develop, and I hope to use photojournalism to tell the stories of people in situations in which their basic human rights are being abused.

Read more about UD students’ research in Malawi.

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Last suppers

1:08 PM  Dec 28th, 2014
by Michelle Tedford

The inmate is not identified by name, but by food: Kentucky Fried Chicken.

The exhibit The Last Supper: 550 Plates Illustrating Final Meals of U.S. Death Row Inmates depicts the last suppers of death row inmates as painted on plates.

“We all have food in common,” said the artist, Julie Green, a professor at Oregon State University. “Working on The Last Supper provides time to meditate on final meals and our system of capital punishment.”

The exhibit is part of an examination of the death penalty through the interdisciplinary curriculum “Rites. Rights. Writes.”

A last meal request humanizes death row in a way that can stimulate thoughtful discussion, said Judith Huacuja, chair of the Department of Art and Design.

“This is an ironic moment because it pairs humanity with the fact that society kills people,” she said.

The exhibit, on display at the Dayton Art Institute Feb. 21 – April 12, is a partnership between UD and the institute.

Art major Kenzie Barron ’15 said the accessibility of the meals and the simplicity of their presentation can start conversations that go beyond the death penalty. The exhibit, she said, “makes us evaluate the way we as society value life in general.”

Learn more about 2015 Rites. Rights. Writes. events.

Read a commentary on the death penalty by former Gov. Bob Taft.

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