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Being neighborly: Phil Warth supports geopolitical education.

Know thy neighbor

9:06 AM  Sep 28th, 2015
by Melanie Henterly

Phil Warth ’69 believes that if you know your neighbor, you will want to be friends. “To not know them is to misunderstand them,” he said.

Warth is the founder of Facilitated Growth, a New York-based private equity firm, and chairs the board of First Nonprofit Foundation. Warth has succeeded professionally in terrain where nonprofits meet entrepreneurship. Now he wants future UD students to succeed where their education meets public issues — and the world. He and his wife, Cynthia, have established a $1 million charitable trust at UD. It will fund critical thinking for evaluating public problems and policies and the expansion of geopolitical studies.

“I think understanding one another makes people less likely to support the notion of war and makes governments less likely to explore that,” he said.

Warth has come to know others in a variety of ways. He has served as a city planner, as president of America’s Second Harvest, the Nation’s Food Bank Network (now Feeding America) and as president and CEO of First Nonprofit Insurance Co.

He said UD helped him develop critical thinking skills, which he calls a “necessary component of getting to the truth of things.”

He said he also values UD’s close-knit campus, so the trust also will assist with renovations of Kennedy Union. “It’s THE gathering place on campus,” he said, “and it’s important for it to be comfortable and desirable.”

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The world is our classroom

9:28 AM  Sep 27th, 2015
by President Daniel J. Curran

During my first year as president, I drove to Salyersville, Ky., where students have spent the last 50 summers living among the people.

As we sat on the porch of a 1930s farmhouse, we talked about their volunteer experiences in Appalachia and the impending war in Iraq. Cars passed by, often with a honk of the horn or a shout of “Hey, Dayton!” Later, we joined hands and prayed for the families of Salyersville, our University and for peace in the world.

For us, porches are an enduring symbol. They represent the Marianist sense of hospitality and openness to the world around us. From the porch, our students step out into the world — to study, conduct research and use their community-building skills to serve others while they discover their true selves.

Learning from young people in a place far from campus — it’s how I started my presidency, and it’s how I also spent part of this summer, the start of the final year of my presidency. I joined 21 students in the historic Piazza della Repubblica in Florence, Italy, on their first day of an interdisciplinary course taught by art historian Roger Crum, paleontologist Dan Goldman and medievalist Bobbi Sutherland.

I offered a sociological perspective while my colleagues talked about the significance of this ancient public square from their disciplines. We then sent the students off in four directions to bring back artifacts illustrating what they had just learned. They returned with a holy card, a flower, a stone and even a piece of fruit masterfully interpreted — all to communicate that all knowledge is connected.

We provide students with an education that connects their majors to the world they will enter upon graduation. This summer, more than 400 students earned credit or participated in service opportunities in 17 countries. They studied automotive engineering in eastern Germany, psychology in Paris and peacebuilding in Kosovo. In a remote village in Zambia, students volunteered in schools and hospitals. Doctoral students in physical therapy taught classes at Nanjing Medical University in China, while other students studied at our China Institute in Suzhou.

From Salyersville to Suzhou, we are connected by the bonds of knowledge, by the bonds of community.

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Parting_words

Lend me your 8 seconds

9:27 AM  Sep 27th, 2015
by Michelle Tedford '94

You’re no goldfish — and don’t let anyone tell you otherwise.

If you were, you’d have an attention span of 9 seconds. In three seconds, you’d swim off and miss the most important part of this story. So here it is: Thank you.

If you’re still reading this, you’re no typical human, either. Our species now registers an attention span of just 8 seconds. In our hyper-connected world, every ding, flicker and vibration remind us more of where we aren’t than where we are.

Maybe that’s why a publication rooted in place holds such appeal.

Seven years ago, we redesigned our beloved tabloid into the University of Dayton Magazine with a mission to engage, educate and entertain all those in our Flyer family. Our mission remains, but with this issue we offer you an update to both design and content, based on the feedback you’ve given us in reader surveys and magazine letters.

Here’s what you’ll find:

Youth: We’ve picked cleaner and larger fonts to help go easy on the eyes and make you feel 10 years younger, especially in Class Notes [Page 49].

Wealth: Hidden Treasure is one of our most popular features. We’ve given it more space to highlight the rich art that accompanies the stories [Page 20].

Love: It’s the heart of the Marianist spirit, and it’s a gift you share widely — even when confined to 140 characters. MainStream highlights your voices — and a whole lotta hearts [Page 7].

Time: More short pieces, graphics and quick hits give you ways to connect with the UD community [The Alumni, Page 43].

Knowledge: Continued access to UD experts, like professor Mary Fisher and her research to help our loved ones who’ve had breast cancer [Page 36].

Beauty: We’ve made more space for photographs, ones that welcome you in and bring you back [View Finder, Page 13, and “Guided by Faith,” Page 22].

In a world flashing for attention, you’ve told us that more than half of you spend more than a half hour with each issue. Fifty-nine percent of you read beyond your class year and read most of Class Notes. Sixty-four percent of you read all or most of the features. Even our most recent alumni — those 25 years and under — prefer to read their UD stories by holding paper in their hands.

We know your time is precious to you, and we’re humbled that you’ve chosen to share some of it with us. Thank you. And keep letting us know what you think.

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Born in 1945, Father Manuel Cortés, S.M., a native of Valencia, Spain, holds degrees in physics and theology. In 2006, he was elected the 14th superior general of the Society of Mary. Although he technically resides in Rome, he spends half his time traveling the world visiting Marianist communities. Here he is surrounded by a group of students and two Marianist brothers in Karonga, Malawi.

Father Manuel Cortés, S.M.

9:23 AM  Sep 27th, 2015
by Thomas M. Columbus

On what ministries are the Marianists worldwide focusing?

We asked that question of Father Manuel Cortés, S.M., superior general of the Society of Mary. His answer:

In all countries where we are present, Marianists focus on our ministries of education, understood as the formation of the whole person, according to the perfect human model, Jesus. Since the days of Blessed William Joseph Chaminade, we have considered this the service the Lord asked of us: to form human persons in the way that Mary formed Jesus as a human being. We call ourselves “Marianists” because we are called to continue the educational mission of Mary in our Church and in our world. Inspired and accompanied by Mary, our vocation is to form others to become brothers and sisters of Jesus, as well as brothers and sisters of each other.

As Marianists, we are open to any type of ministry that may serve to form persons. In addition to our educational institutions, we are committed to other ministries that exercise an important educational influence — such as parishes; programs promoting social justice; adult formation; faith communities; and attending to those excluded from educational systems owing to social, economic or other circumstances.

Chaminade, deeply touched by an era of great change, that of the French Revolution, understood people’s need to be educated, to receive the formation needed to avoid being swallowed up by the turmoil of great cultural change. We are living through a similar period, a time of perhaps even more profound change. Pope Benedict XVI characterized it as an “educational emergency,” and Pope

Francis has not ceased calling for the dedication of all possible resources to address this clear need in the area of education. In light of this, Marianists cannot but feel spurred on in our mission. We hope that the Lord will give us vocations to be able to continue to develop in this area.

The educational emergency of our age appears most acutely in the poorest societies and among those marginalized in the richer societies. The “good life” of those who live in opulence increasingly leaves behind victims condemned to poverty and hunger. We Christians cannot remain indifferent to the cry of the poor, as Pope Francis has repeated so often. Since the 1950s, the Marianists have responded to this call by founding communities and works in poor countries and marginalized areas. We are present in 33 countries. In 18 of these, we have been present only since the last half of the 20th century, with the great majority of these having a high level of poverty.

Our Marianist focus, therefore, remains faithful to our founder’s vision but also very much in conformity with the needs of today’s world. Our ministry remains deeply rooted in Marianist tradition and spirituality and very much alive in active mission.

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columbus

Columbus, Ohio

9:22 AM  Sep 27th, 2015
by Audrey Starr

Less than 75 miles east of Dayton, alumni in Columbus, Ohio, often feel just a few steps away from UD’s back porch. With nearly 10,000 Flyers roaming the capital’s streets, intentional reunions are easy — and random sightings aren’t uncommon.

We often hear of random run-ins between Flyers out and about. What’s the most recent encounter you’ve had with a fellow Flyer, and where were you?

“We have five lawyers in our suite of offices [at Cline Mann Law], and four are UD law grads. The fifth is an Ohio State law grad — but his son went to UD for undergraduate school. UD is taking over the universe! At least my universe.”
—William Mann ’79

“I run into Rob Ryan ’93 about every other week at a random restaurant in Grandview, Ohio. It’s never planned; just random bumping into.”
—Jeff Mattingly ’92

“I meet Flyer folks in airports, the grocery store, waiting for a train, sitting in a watering hole — pretty much somewhere, anywhere in the world.”
—John H. Heller ’78

Columbus Alumni By the Numbers
Total Alumni: 9,116
Undergraduate: 4,181
Graduate: 4,935

Male: 3,914
Female: 5,202

Graduation Classes
All: 1930s-2010s
Most: 2000s

Academic Area
Education: 4,264
Arts & Sciences: 1,992
Business: 1,836
Engineering: 780
Law: 244

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expertinstruction

Live free and buy

9:17 AM  Sep 27th, 2015
by Michelle Tedford '94

Every consumer decision can be your vote for freedom — or your support of slavery.

RosaLia Stadler takes her choices seriously. A junior political science and human rights major, she has researched slavery used in creating consumer products.

The International Labor Organization reports that 20.9 million workers are coerced and trapped in jobs worldwide. They could be picking your coffee, sewing your clothes or packaging your produce. Lies and intimidation could be keeping them in low-paying jobs or unsafe conditions. In other cases, it’s barbed wire and shackles.

Stadler is researching whether consumers are willing to pay more for slave-free products. She’s also changing her consumer habits to make the best shopping choices possible. Here are her tips.

1. Educate yourself. For Stadler, it began in high school when her father had her watch the movie Taken. “This really happens?” she asked about the plot: kidnappers abducting girls for the sex trade. The answer is yes, even in Ohio. She recommends the Polaris Project for issue and advocacy information and Abolition Ohio, a UD-started organization created to stir society’s conscience about all forms of slavery.

2. Look for the green label. Fair Trade USA certifies products to help you choose those made by companies supporting sustainable livelihoods for workers and the environment. Stadler purchases only fair-trade coffee. Grocery shopping does take longer when you’re on the hunt. “You have to look for the green label,” she says. “It’s not on every box of cereal or vegetable.”

3. Google it. When training for a half-marathon, Stadler knew she needed better choices for her running shoes. So she Googled “ethically made tennis shoes.” Her research led her to choose Mizuno Wave Inspire.

4. Think local. It’s hard to know the worker history of clothing you pull off the rack. Unless the manufacturer specifically labels its products, it is best to fall back on what you know. “I try to buy made-in-America clothes, and I thrift shop a lot,” she says. She also buys local produce.

5. Shop at a fair trade store. Stadler has one in her hometown of Akron, Ohio. There, she buys gifts — which also help educate the recipient. “I wear three bracelets to remind me of what I’m so passionate about,” she says. “One made in Nepal supports women’s education; a second was a gift and equals a month’s worth of water in Ethiopia; and the third I bought in Dayton to support the Polaris Project.”

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yakopcic2

Sweet Time Blues

9:13 AM  Sep 27th, 2015
by Judi Hetrick

An album by Chris Yakopcic ’09.

A musician’s life vacillates from hours of solitary work to roars of au-dience appreciation. Blues writer and guitarist Chris Yakopcic  heard quite a roar earlier this year at the International Blues Challenge in Memphis, Tennessee. He was one of 10 finalists in the solo competition, performing four tunes, including “Sweet Time Blues.” Yakopcic plays fingerstyle acoustic guitar, drawing from both Delta and Piedmont blues. His first CD, Done Found My Freedom ’fore My Technique, will be followed this fall by a new release. Yakopcic plays several venues in the Dayton region; he can most often be found at Dayton’s Tumbleweed Connection and always at chrisyakopcicmusic.com.

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cuba

Cuba: The Forgotten Revolution

9:12 AM  Sep 27th, 2015
by Judi Hetrick

A film by Glenn Gebhard ’72.

The United States has just restored relations with Cuba, but Glenn Gebhard has visited and filmed documentaries there for nearly two decades. Gebhard studied Spanish at UD. “I was interested in what a socialist country looked like,” he said. This year’s Cuba: The Forgotten Revolution is the fourth Cuba film by Gebhard, professor of film production at Loyola Marymount University. He worked with UD history professor Juan Santamarina on 2006’s Lifetime of Passion, which looks at people in Cuba and in the exile community in Miami. The other titles are Dreaming a New Cuba and Crossing Borders: A Cuban Returns.

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skalka

Death at Gills Rock

9:11 AM  Sep 27th, 2015
by Judi Hetrick

A book by Patricia Skalka ’68.

When Patricia Skalka stepped through the Flyer News doorway, she knew she was walking into life as a writer. Now she’s stepped away from nonfiction to create mysteries set in Door County, Wisconsin. Her protagonist, Dave Cubiak, is a displaced former Chicago homicide detective. Critics have praised Skalka for details that convey a sharp sense of place. They also admire the puzzles of her mysteries and her treatment of characters. Her first mystery, Death Stalks Door County, was published in 2014. Her second book, Death at Gills Rock, was published earlier this year, and the third is in the works.

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groteblog

Random Thoughts from Midlife

9:10 AM  Sep 27th, 2015
by Judi Hetrick

A blog by Christine Smith Grote ’79.

Christine Smith Grote writes to connect with people. Her blog, “Random Thoughts from Midlife,” started in January 2011 as she was publishing a memoir about her beloved sister Annie, born with severe brain damage. She also has shared her father’s experience with Alzheimer’s and her mother’s death from cancer. Readers respond, and Grote loves the connections. “You really can establish a support community online,” she said. Grote tackles more than 30 categories, ranging from publishing to gardening. Posts about her husband’s bilateral knee surgery are particularly popular with readers hungry for such information.

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