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Indianapolis

10:45 AM  Dec 9th, 2013
by Megan Garrison '14

The most famous catacombs in the world are in Paris, but UD alumni don’t have to travel halfway around the world to experience a set of intertwining tunnels with a rich history. They just need to meet up with UD’s
Indianapolis alumni chapter.

“The chapter meets six to 10 times, annually,” said Melissa Weseli ’04, chapter president, who listed activities like gamewatches and Christmas off Campus as popular offerings. “We host at least five main events each year.”

The chapter focuses on lifelong learning, culture, art, student outreach, spiritual growth, networking and service. The nearly 1,400 members provide a vast selection of activities to enjoy in the Hoosier state, but it’s what the Indianapolis chapter chose as its cultural event last spring that caught the attention of several other chapters.

“In my job at the Indianapolis Marriott Downtown, I had heard about the City Market catacomb tours as a fun thing to do while visiting the city. I thought our local alumni would enjoy it, too,” Weseli said.
The tunnels that rest below the traffic and hubbub in Indiana’s capital city were constructed more than a hundred years ago. Instead of housing the dead, these tunnels were used to transport and store meats and produce sold at the City Market before the days of refrigeration. More than a century has passed, yet the limestone and brick archways are still intact and apt for exploring.

“We were able to partner with Indiana Landmarks, a fantastic organization that hosts this public historical tour along with the others in the state,” Weseli said. “The 30-minute tour was on a Saturday afternoon in the middle of June, taking us underground to see all the remains of a historical plaza that was destroyed by a fire in the 1950s.”

The catacombs were a nice place to cool down during the hot summer day, with a wide range of alumni participating.

“Most of us had never explored that part of our city, including me,” Weseli said. “We will definitely do something like that again in 2014.”

While UD alumni make a home in Indianapolis, they aren’t just staying for the Indy 500 and Hoosier pride, but a slice of history that lies just below their feet.

How can you have lots of fun, for little cash, in Indy?

“St. Joan of Arc French Market, the first Saturday after Labor Day. It’s free and always has a UD vs. Notre Dame volunteer challenge going.”
—James Seidel ’70 and Molly Pritchard Seidel ’71

“Visiting the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Museum is one of my favorite things in Indy and one of the best values around. For just a small additional fee you can take the bus tour around the grounds of the track.”
—King Doxsee ’90

“Tailgating at the Hurst Beanery before a Colts game, Three Wise Men in Broad Ripple for pizza and beer or going to Clowes Hall at Butler for a concert.”
—Mike Bosway ’80 and Betsy Sweeney Bosway ’81

“Running, walking or biking on the ever-expanding Monon Trail or the downtown canal. Listening to music at outdoor concerts held at various parks in the summer.“
—Margaret Adamek ’82

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10storiesdown

10 Stories Down

10:40 AM  Dec 9th, 2013
by Audrey Starr

A book by Vincent F.A. Golphin ’79

Golphin originally intended to blog his account of being a visiting professor in Beijing, but China’s stringent firewalls kept him from accessing it. So, he journaled and drafted poems by hand. From his perch in a 10th-floor apartment, Golphin writes about “a world we haven’t begun to explore.” Of his work, he says, “I never know what’s going to come of my books; it’s sort of like a paper lantern over a pond: it will go wherever it goes, and I hope it brings light.”

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Harney-Peak-Revealed

Harney Peak Revealed: A Natural, Historical and Cultural Gem in South Dakota’s Black Hills

10:37 AM  Dec 9th, 2013
by Audrey Starr

A book by Brad Saum ’88

A finalist in the 2013 Next Generation Indie Book Awards’ regional nonfiction category, Saum’s book delves into the history of Harney Peak, the highest point in the Black Hills of western South Dakota. It features a wide collection of unearthed artifacts, like an 1899 newspaper ad offering burro rides. A former park ranger, Saum promises the 7-mile hike to Harney Peak is worth it. “You can imagine Mount Rushmore sculptor Gutzon Borglum standing on the peak, peering across the pine trees and spotting a rock outcropping a few miles away, declaring it the site of a grand mountain carving.”

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mortal sin on my soul

Mortal Sin On My Soul

10:33 AM  Dec 9th, 2013
by Audrey Starr

A book by Mary Murray Bosrock

“Before I was old enough to go to school, I knew three things. We were Irish, we were Catholic and we didn’t talk to our next-door neighbors.” So begins a chapter in Bosrock’s memoir of 1950s life in Sandusky, Ohio. The second-youngest of eight children — five of whom attended UD — she recalls an era where “innocence reigned and nuns ruled” and includes tales of her time on campus in the early 1960s. Bosrock, who has written more than 10 books, says, “When I turned 65, I decided instead of getting serious about writing, I would only write what I loved. And this book was a labor of love.”

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You Know What I'm Sayin'?

You Know What I’m Sayin’? A Handbook on How to Deliver Effective Presentations

10:30 AM  Dec 9th, 2013
by Audrey Starr

A book by Heather Johnson Parsons ’95

At 10 years old, Parsons spent two weeks preparing for a class speech. Armed with plenty of research and hours of practice, she stood in front of her classmates — and was too paralyzed with fear to deliver a single word. In her book, You Know What I’m Sayin’?, the communications lecturer advises readers on how to avoid this and other common public speaking horrors. “I wrote the book for the average person who has never taken a public speaking course; but it was also on my bucket list,” Parsons says. “I wanted to challenge myself and prove that I could do it. Most of my friends don’t even know I wrote it.”

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hatchet

Unburying the hatchet

10:25 AM  Dec 9th, 2013
by Audrey Starr

It sounds like a never-published Nancy Drew book: The mystery of the hidden hatchet.

Sent to University Archives 40 years ago by then-president Father Raymond Roesch, S.M. ’36, this handheld tool — a mere 12-by-6 inches but weighing in at 2 pounds — was unearthed during the last significant overhaul of Immaculate Conception Chapel.

“This hatchet was found in the base of the main altar in the chapel when it was removed during the renovation in 1971,” Roesch wrote. “Thus, it was probably used in the construction of the chapel in 1869.”

The chapel is UD’s third-oldest building (behind Zehler and Liberty halls), celebrating its 145th anniversary next year. Steam heat arrived in 1898, followed by electric lights a year later.

A major renovation also occurred in 1949.

While the tool’s origin is uncertain, Doug Gaier ’86, president of the Ohio Tool Collectors Association, agrees that it looks like a shingling hatchet, a common construction tool in the 19th century. A smaller sibling of an ax, it was used to shape shingles and nail them in place, with a notch on one end for pulling nails.

University Archivist Jennifer Brancato has one theory.

“According to Eric Sloane’s book, A Museum of Early American Tools, these hatchets had a hole in the handle so the worker could hang it from his wrist. Ours doesn’t have a hole, so maybe it was dropped and never picked up,” she said.

Or, its placement could have been intentional. Placing relics beneath altars was a frequent liturgical practice, said Crystal Sullivan, director of campus ministry. In Catholic theology, an ax or hatchet can be an emblem of St. Joseph, indicating his work as a carpenter.

Covered in decades of dirt and rust, a maker’s mark on one side of the blade is illegible, save for a clear “No. 2” etched at the top and the words “cast steel,” indicating its blade material. The handle is carved wood, worn smooth with age.

A good mystery isn’t complete without a twist, though. Viggo Rambusch, whose New York City-based architectural design company completed the chapel renovations in 1971, remembers it a bit differently.

“I have fond memories of Father Roesch and the remodeling of the chapel for post-Vatican II,” he said, “but for some vague reason, I think the hatchet was found in the pulpit.”

If there are any secrets left to uncover in UD’s chapel, they might be found next year: renovations to update the space are planned for 2014.

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The Krogers on their 60th wedding anniversary.

A lifelong commitment

10:21 AM  Dec 9th, 2013
by Maureen Schlangen

Married 63 years, Frederick J. and Marian A. Kroger were friends to the end, only briefly parted by death in January 2013.

When they died — just six days apart — their legacy was already large: faith, family, service and generosity. It grew even larger when the Krogers’ five children gathered to decide how to designate the trust their parents committed to the University in 1997.

“My parents were always devoted to God, family and country,” said Tim Kroger, who is a partner in Main Line Supply, the company started in 1955 by his father, a 1947 mechanical engineering graduate who came to UD after serving in World War II. Having escaped from a German prisoner-of-war camp late in the war, Kroger committed in gratitude to serving others for the rest of his life — and he did.

“He volunteered for everything,” Tim Kroger said. “Parish Council; the Knights of Columbus; St. Vincent de Paul; and the Inca Ball, which raised funds for missions in Central and South America. He would visit people in jail, and as far back as I can remember, they sponsored children in poverty around the world. They were involved with the Glenmary mission and the Marianists, and somehow, he came to all of our sporting events, too, all while growing Main Line Supply.”

Mrs. Kroger, an “extremely diligent wife and mother,” was a model of devotion to family and Catholic education, and their devotion to one another never faltered, Tim Kroger said. In their last days together at hospice, they shared a room, and the staff turned their beds so they could see each other.

“They sent all of us to Catholic schools, and they helped send all 16 of their grandkids to college,” Tim Kroger said. “The Catholic faith was very important to them, and they loved the University of Dayton.”

In tribute to the Krogers’ commitment to the University, to their faith and to Chaminade Julienne, the Marianist high school all of their children attended, Tim Kroger and his siblings — Anne Shock, Mary Helldoerfer, Mark Kroger and Pat Kroger — directed their parents’ gift to two initiatives: a new scholarship for UD-bound students from area Marianist high schools; and the upcoming renovation of the University’s Immaculate Conception Chapel.

“Our parents had the foresight to give to UD and CJ and various churches in the area, and one of their last requests of their children was to please continue this,” Tim Kroger said. “Their scholarship fund at UD will continue to grow.”

A good plan

For decades, planned giving has been an important foundation of the University of Dayton’s advancement, providing students with outstanding academic programs, world-renowned faculty, scholarships and state-of-the-art facilities. A planned gift is more than an act of generosity; it’s a demonstration of faith in the University — and the University of Dayton is grateful and honored to be entrusted with it.

The University received more than $3 million from planned gifts in 2012-13, and new planned gift commitments surpassed $5 million. Among those gifts was that of lifelong Daytonians and longtime University benefactors Frederick J. and Marian A. Kroger.

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Pumpkin-Pie-Whole-Slice

How to host a (mostly healthy, pretty happy) holiday meal

10:14 AM  Dec 9th, 2013
by Audrey Starr

When Erin O’Connell ’14 sits down at her family’s holiday table each year, she expects a side of laughter with her cheesy potatoes. They will tease each other about who got to fill their plate first (the O’Connells line up by height, shortest in front) and continue poking fun at the couple who mailed frozen meat to an aunt in advance of the party — but forgot to tell her, so it thawed on her front stoop.

“Sitting down together over a meal is crucial to our relationships with each other, and to food,” says O’Connell, a senior dietetics major and president of the Student Dietetics Association. She notes that coming together at the table is central to the Marianist tradition.

As psychology professor Jack Bauer points out, “People need rituals. We are hard-wired to be part of groups, especially family, and in a time when our society is so complex — people are living all over and are busy — we need to have a set place where it all comes together, even just once a year.”

Meals also offer time for reflection. “You don’t need to have long, in-depth conversations about the meaning of life. Just by talking about the things that you’re doing, that you’re interested in, you’re talking about what’s important to you. You’re checking in with each other, and maybe finding ways to help each other,” says Bauer, who serves as Roesch Chair in the Social Sciences.

1. The family that cooks together, stays together. Or, at least stays happier. “Cooking as a group takes the pressure off one person to prepare the whole meal and be stuck in the kitchen,” O’Connell says. Also, plan ahead. If hosting a potluck, coordinate dishes so there’s adequate oven space, or ask guests to bring cold dishes, like a salad or fruit tray.

2. Think big (but serve small). In Brian Wansink’s book Mindless Eating, he notes that when food is placed in a smaller serving bowl with smaller serving utensils, people will take and eat less. “It’s a mental thing. You think you are eating the same as you would from a bigger bowl, but you actually serve yourself less and are still satisfied,” O’Connell explains. Aim to fill your table with a quarter protein, half vegetables and fruit, and a quarter grains.

3. Eat first, play later. No, you don’t have to give up grandma’s triple-layer pecan pie. But eating lean protein and vegetables before arriving can help you make clearer choices. “You’ll eat less because you’ll be full faster,” O’Connell says. Then, get moving: run a 5K together, throw a Frisbee around the yard or turn on some tunes and dance. “My family always plays flag football the day after Thanksgiving,” O’Connell says. “We enjoy working together as a team, but it also helps people feel relaxed and happy since physical activity produces endorphins.” She recommends scheduling your fun between dinner and dessert; it allows your cells to use those nutrients before you ingest more sugar.

4. Keep the fun (not the food poisoning) going. One memory no one wants: an illness epidemic. “Don’t let the food sit out for more than 90 minutes,” O’Connell says. “Not only does this follow recommended food safety guidelines, it also keeps you from eating more.” Another idea: Leftovers can make great one-dish entrees the next day, with little effort. O’Connell suggests turkey noodle soup, gnocchi using mashed potatoes, or a casserole. “Combine the rest of your vegetables, turkey and stuffing, add a cream soup, and put it in the oven.”

5. What guests don’t know won’t hurt them. One final tip: “If you alter recipes to reduce the fat and sugar, keep it a secret,” O’Connell advises. “Not everyone is ready to make those changes.”

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Housemates for UD Magazine Winter 2013-14

Success is happiness

10:03 AM  Dec 9th, 2013
by Michelle Tedford '94

Standing with hands submerged in a sudsy sink, surrounded by my college housemates, I was reminded of my life at UD.

Doing dishes was not one of those memories.

At 114 Chambers St., our dysfunction manifested itself in towers of starchy pasta pots and dinnerware. Some of us bullheadedly refused to wash a dish that wasn’t ours. Others of us had no conception of the need for dishes to be washed.

Since then, we’ve all learned a few things, such as how much we mean to one another. That was reinforced this October when five of us rendezvoused in Chicago for a girls’ weekend. It was our first quorum since a 2005 wedding. We had meant to reunite a year earlier for a 40th birthday celebration, but a birth and a death and other messy stuff called life just got in the way. As we cooked and ate and talked and did one another’s dishes, we understood just how much we had missed, and how much we had missed one another.

 

At TEDxDayton Nov. 15, Justin Bayer ’01 revealed the secret to success. It’s the kind of simple solution we’re all born with but, sometime between birth and high school, the tag washes away and we simply forget how to care for ourselves.

“Success is happiness.” Justin’s wide smile crinkled both corners of his eyes as he stood on stage at the Victoria Theatre before a packed house ready to be infused and inspired. He told the story of his guidance counselor who once … twice … five times told him to visit the University of Dayton. The Cincinnati high schooler had no intention of attending a college 50 miles to the north. But he acquiesced, and he visited. “I call that visit the turning point for the rest of my life — something just felt right,” he said.

He found his MARV — meaning, accomplishment, relationships and vitality. Justin uses the acronym to describe the path to success. In his business, Welcome to College, he shares the MARV philosophy with students to help them avoid becoming national statistics like the 56 percent of college students who report feeling lonely, 44 percent hopeless or 85 percent overwhelmed.

 

College, for me, was a good first step. But moving into that crummy landlord house on the Dark Side and living with always smart, forever talented, often loud women who during the next three years challenged me daily changed my life. As one housemate said in Chicago, at UD was the first time she felt like a rockstar. And in the glow of one another’s spotlights, we all grew to realize our dreams. These women are my MARV.

Two weeks after that reunion, I again had my hands in a sudsy sink, this time in Bowling Green, Ohio, for the funeral of Patrick Fitzgerald ’66, the father of Kerri, my Chambers Street roommate. He will be remembered as a happy grandpa whose eyes crinkled as he smiled, a champion of public television and human rights, a lover of family, friends and Jameson, which we raised to him in a toast.

Sounds like success to me.

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Dan Curran for President's Message UD Magazine Winter 2013-14 by Larry Burgess

A sacred place for all

9:47 AM  Dec 9th, 2013
by President Daniel J. Curran

Whenever I walk through campus and spot the towering blue dome of the chapel, I instantly feel at home — and at peace.

I occasionally take a break from the busyness of the day to steal a few moments, sit in the chapel, reflect and be one with God. This is the spiritual heart of our campus. It’s a place to witness grace in our lives. It’s where we come together to celebrate, to find solace, to pray in community.

During my time in the Chapel of the Immaculate Conception, I have seen that it is in need of care. We’ve completed only partial renovations of the chapel since its construction by the Marianists in 1869.

Today, this sacred place deserves a thoughtful and unified renovation. We want to improve the interior to meet contemporary liturgical requirements while bringing back the wood finishes, warm colors, pews, artistic touches and the simple elegance of yesteryear. I recently reviewed preliminary sketches for new stained glass windows that will mimic the original colors and patterns — and respect the chapel’s rich history.

More than $11 million toward a $12 million renovation has been committed from trustees, alumni and friends, including a major bequest and a recent anonymous $3 million gift. I’m confident we can meet this fundraising goal and begin a yearlong renovation in August 2014. I’m so grateful to our supporters for their faith in this project.

Earlier this year, we entered into a formal partnership with the Church of the Holy Angels, which sits in the middle of campus among student houses on the corner of Brown and L streets. This is not a merger but a true collaboration. A graduate assistant is helping to direct a K-6 faith formation program at the parish, and undergraduates in the two-year Forum for Young Catechetical Leaders program are teaching catechism classes and offering programs in adult faith formation and sacramental preparation.

Most importantly, when we need a larger worship space, Holy Angels will now be available. That has allowed the University to recommend a renovation rather than an expansion of the chapel. We are now working with a liturgical consultant and architect to finalize the plans.

Preliminary plans call only for a modest addition on the south side of the building for a bride’s room, reconciliation room and restrooms. As people walk through the chapel’s beautiful wooden doors, they will enter a new gathering space. Just inside the chapel, a baptismal font will serve as a visual reminder of the origins of our faith. Traditional wood pews will replace the chairs. Every detail, from the art and statues to the religious symbols used on the windows and walls, will reflect a desire to enhance the chapel’s natural beauty and create greater harmony.

The newly renovated chapel will stand as a testament to what a community of believers can accomplish through faith and action. It will be a symbol of our gratitude to our Marianist founders, who taught us that we are to use our knowledge and faith to make a difference in the lives of others.

It will be a sacred place for all.

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