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Where in the world…

1:10 PM  Feb 2nd, 2006
by Jessica Gibson-James

I’m not sure how anyone got anywhere without Mapquest to tell you to turn left or right in exactly 1.3 miles. But Mapquest doesn’t work on campus. It can’t tell me how to get to Gosiger or Chaminade.

I am not afraid to ask for directions, but it’s difficult for someone to reply when you have few common reference points. I asked my boss how to get to Gosiger (which, unknowingly, I pronounced as Go-seeger, making her laugh for quite a while). She tells me to go past Marianist Hall and I’ll find it before I get to VWK. I then ask, where’s Marianist again? My boss tells me where I can find a campus map and wishes me luck.

I bravely head for the map but my eyes glaze over as I look at all the colored boxes and numbers. That’s OK, because if you want to get directions on campus all you have to do is stand and look at a map. Without fail someone will stop to ask if you need help and then will gladly point you in the right direction. I know because it’s happened to me three times.
UD deserves its reputation for its friendly campus.

I was able to repay the favor when a student stopped me and my husband to ask how to get to the registrar’s office. My husband pointed him to St. Mary Hall. It was nice to be able to help, but as he walked away, I had a sinking feeling. I asked my husband if he was sure the registrar’s office was in St. Mary’s. “Isn’t it?” he asked. Well, at least we were friendly even if we weren’t exactly right.

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‘Glory be to God for dappled things’

8:02 AM  Jan 31st, 2006
by Thomas M. Columbus

One day recently about three dozen people here gave up their lunch hour to hear a Marianist brother read to them.

Brother Tom Wendorf, S.M., of the English department read from a story about a Bible salesman who called on a woman with a wooden leg and then stole it.

“If you’re looking for uplift,” Wendorf said, “you shouldn’t go to Flannery O’Connor.”

You could try Dante: “Abandon all hope ye who enter here.”

Maybe Muriel Spark. Wendorf read from her novel Memento Mori, in which old people receive phone calls telling them they will die.

But so do we all. Perhaps a lunch at which we are munching upon a piece of chocolate imprinted with the chapel logo is as good a time as any to contemplate the four last things: death, judgment, hell and heaven.

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Educación religiosa

8:29 AM  Jan 25th, 2006
by Teri Rizvi

”Every week Johnson (Romero, a graduate assistant) gives the staff a Spanish lesson. If the phone rings, we can at least say, ‘Hola! Cómo estás?”’ Sister Angela Ann Zukowski told representatives from dioceses across the United States.

The room exploded with laughter at the realization that UD’s Institute for Pastoral Initiatives has launched online faith formation classes in Spanish without elementary knowledge of the language.

That’s the beauty of what Zukowski has dubbed the ”Virtual Learning for Faith Formation” program. It’s a collaborative program that employs online facilitators to provide faith formation classes to learners who span the globe. UD is currently teaming up with the Archdiocese of Los Angeles to pilot four Spanish faith formation classes over the Internet in an effort to minister to Hispanics, the nation’s largest minority group. In Los Angeles, they make up nearly half the city’s population.

Zukowski gathered the diocesan partners together Jan. 19-20 to talk about VLFF’s explosive growth and future opportunities. From its first course in Scripture offered in 1999 to lay ecclesial ministers, catechists, Catholic school teachers and youth ministers in the Archdiocese of Cincinnati, the program has grown to include 28 diocesan partners and nearly 400 sections of courses per year, with plans to expand into Asia this year.

”We’re not out there really marketing this. It’s grown by word of mouth,” she said.

And by Zukowski’s energy and passion for expanding faith formation from the traditional classroom to cyberspace.

”Online learners can become lifelong learners,” she said. ”We’re always researching, we’re always dreaming, we’re always changing. The answer to the famous question, ‘Can you form a community of learners in cyberspace?’ is yes.”

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24-hour theater

8:58 AM  Jan 23rd, 2006
by Anthony Fulton, lecturer in UD's department of English

On Friday, Jan. 13, after lecturing on the essential elements of a play to my Introduction to Literature class, I rushed off to Columbus, Ohio, to write a one-act play in less than 12 hours. For four years, BlueForms Theatre Group has been hosting “24 Hour Theater,” in which six short plays are written, cast, rehearsed and performed in a period of 24 hours. This year’s event, called “The Bride of 24 Hours,” kicked off at 8 p.m. on a Friday night.

The 20 participating actors arrived in silly costumes, equipped with even sillier props. As they joked and laughed, I sat off to the side, deciding that the event was torture disguised as art. Randomly paired with four actors, I wrote for a woman in a white lab coat, a “goth” girl, a stylish 20-something, and a woman cradling a log. At 9 p.m., I felt like passing out. At 10, I soothed a mounting panic attack with fast food. At midnight, I hit upon a simple but quirky family scene and ran with it.

Watching the show the next night, I caught myself laughing hysterically — not from lack of sleep but because I was having fun. I never thought I’d have fun, but I guess that’s another element of a play, even the 24-hour kind.

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A semester with Adèle

8:39 AM  
by Matthew Dewald

Soft-spoken senior Erin Anderson quieted Kennedy Union’s Torch Lounge as she talked of living in community with four 70-years-plus nuns in small Agen, France, in spring 2005. Like the tiny nun who dragged Anderson’s 70-pound suitcase to the car when she arrived, Anderson’s words and demeanor reminded one of the many manifestations of strength.

Her unusual study abroad experience was an effort to learn more about Adèle de Batz de Trenquelléon, one of the founders of the Society of Mary.

“To get from the kitchen to the dining room, I had to pass by her tomb,” she said. “At night the halls of the 17th-century convent scared the hell out of me. I found myself pausing to offer prayers of thanks and gratitude for this woman’s life and great faith.”

Reflecting on the meaning and purpose of Adèle’s life was really a way of thinking about herself, she suggested.

Like Adèle, Anderson picked up a pen and began writing old-fashioned letters to friends and family of her days helping teach at a local school and her trips in the area.

“I reckon some graduating seniors out there are like me, searching for mission and purpose,” she said.

Anderson was one of a dozen speakers at the day-long Chaminade Day Teach-in today.

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Lessons from a Nobel Peace Prize winner

8:33 AM  
by Lynette Heard

Nobel Peace Prize winner John Hume made a brief visit at the University of Dayton board of trustees winter meeting and retreat Jan. 19. Hume, co-recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize in 1998 for his efforts to bring peace to Ireland, outlined the principles upon which the peace negotiations were based:

• Respect for differences and an understanding for the diversity of ideas, races, principles and socio-economic status.

• Institutional representatives who are proportionally elected are the responsible parties.

• Parties that work together in the common interest, “the socio-economic interest,” of the people and the nation. Through this work, they will shed “sweat but not blood,” he said.

Hume’s work was built on the idea that borders in Ireland were not lines on a map but in the hearts and minds of the people. Hume was a founding member of Northern Ireland’s predominantly Roman Catholic Social Democratic and Labour Party, which he led from 1979 to 2001. The Nobel Committee cited Hume and Peace Prize co-recipient David Trimble, leader of the Ulster Unionist party, for their role in bringing about an agreement aimed at settling “the national religious and social conflict in Northern Ireland that has cost over 3,500 people their lives.”

Hume, who retired from politics in 2004, said he found inspiration for his work when he visited the United States, learned more about the presidency of Abraham Lincoln and became fascinated with the concept of E pluribus Unum — “through many, one.” Hume urged trustees to consider ways in which the United States and European nations could come together to end areas of conflict throughout the world. He also urged the board to remember respect for diversity.

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On tap Tuesdays

1:20 PM  Jan 18th, 2006
by Kailyn Derck ’06

Shuffle-ball-change.

Among a few others, like toe-dig and heel-toe, that is what I learned at the Tuesday night Tap Jam at ArtStreet.

Sharon Leahy, UD artist in residence and artistic director of Rhythm in Shoes, hosts a weekly two-hour jam session for tappers of all levels. Some of the dozen-or-so women coming and going from 7 to 9 p.m. were well-trained and could keep up with Leahy’s fast feet. Others, like me, borrowed shoes from a bin and attempted to make some kind of clicking sound.

We began the session on a tapping board in a glass room, Studio A1. As Rick Good, Leahy’s husband, played the guitar, we stood in a circle and Leahy taught us a basic step. We all held the step together and then every other eight-count a new dancer added her own steps. My inexperience was noticeable but not shamed. Leahy was patient with the many beginners and took time to teach us a few moves.

Per Leahy’s request, Good then began a “swingy, mid-tempo” tune and we “traded in,” as Leahy called it. It was almost like a dancer’s challenge: one dancer completed a complicated (or not-so-complicated) eight-count and the second would either repeat her steps or create a more challenging arrangement.

And even if your feet have never filled a tap shoe, it is fun to watch the dancers click away and think, “I could never make my feet move like that! How are they doing it?”

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75 dozen eggs

1:17 PM  
by Deborah McCarty Smith

That’s how many you have to scramble if you’re going to feed 450 people at UD’s annual Martin Luther King Jr. prayer breakfast. While guests are sleepily filing into Kennedy Union ballroom at 7:30 a.m., catering services supervisors and chefs have been at their posts since 5:30 a.m. and the service staff since 6.

In all, they’ll cook 100 pounds of bacon, dish up biscuits and hash browns, pour 25 gallons of orange juice and 50 gallons of coffee and, in their black bowties and aprons, quietly maneuver among the crowded tables to deliver covered plates to each guest. Doug Lemaster, catering services’ general manager, says it takes 138 hours of student labor and 40 hours of staff time to stage the annually sold-out event. Despite the early start, the UD students who make up most of the service and prep staff, clocked “nearly 100 percent attendance, and they really did an excellent job.”

Melissa Clark, event coordinator, and Rosie O’Boyle of student development choose the menu in December. The week before the breakfast, catering management, supervisors and chefs all meet to plan the event down to the smallest details.

After a keynote address by columnist Clarence Page and the traditional singing of “Lift Ev’ry Voice and Sing,” guests were back in their classrooms and offices by 9 a.m., bodies nourished, hearts challenged and spirits uplifted.

“I just love it when a plan comes together,” Lemaster said.

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On tap Tuesdays

10:08 AM  
by Kailyn Derck ’06

Shuffle-ball-change.

Among a few others, like toe-dig and heel-toe, that is what I learned at the Tuesday night Tap Jam at ArtStreet.
Sharon Leahy, UD artist in residence and artistic director of Rhythm in Shoes, hosts a weekly two-hour jam session for tappers of all levels. Some of the dozen-or-so women coming and going from 7 to 9 p.m. were well-trained and could keep up with Leahy’s fast feet. Others, like me, borrowed shoes from a bin and attempted to make some kind of clicking sound.

We began the session on a tapping board in a glass room, Studio A1. As Rick Good, Leahy’s husband, played the guitar, we stood in a circle and Leahy taught us a basic step. We all held the step together and then every other eight-count a new dancer added her own steps. My inexperience was noticeable but not shamed. Leahy was patient with the many beginners and took time to teach us a few moves.

Per Leahy’s request, Good then began a “swingy, mid-tempo” tune and we “traded in,” as Leahy called it. It was almost like a dancer’s challenge: one dancer completed a complicated (or not-so-complicated) eight-count and the second would either repeat her steps or create a more challenging arrangement.

And even if your feet have never filled a tap shoe, it is fun to watch the dancers click away and think, “I could never make my feet move like that! How are they doing it?”

No Comments

75 dozen eggs

10:02 AM  
by Deborah McCarty Smith

That’s how many you have to scramble if you’re going to feed 450 people at UD’s annual Martin Luther King Jr. prayer breakfast. While guests are sleepily filing into Kennedy Union ballroom at 7:30 a.m., catering services supervisors and chefs have been at their posts since 5:30 a.m. and the service staff since 6.

In all, they’ll cook 100 pounds of bacon, dish up biscuits and hash browns, pour 25 gallons of orange juice and 50 gallons of coffee and, in their black bowties and aprons, quietly maneuver among the crowded tables to deliver covered plates to each guest. Doug Lemaster, catering services’ general manager, says it takes 138 hours of student labor and 40 hours of staff time to stage the annually sold-out event. Despite the early start, the UD students who make up most of the service and prep staff, clocked “nearly 100 percent attendance, and they really did an excellent job.”

Melissa Clark, event coordinator, and Rosie O’Boyle of student development choose the menu in December. The week before the breakfast, catering management, supervisors and chefs all meet to plan the event down to the smallest details.

After a keynote address by columnist Clarence Page and the traditional singing of “Lift Ev’ry Voice and Sing,” guests were back in their classrooms and offices by 9 a.m., bodies nourished, hearts challenged and spirits uplifted.

“I just love it when a plan comes together,” Lemaster said.

No Comments